Sports week: 10 things to know about para-weightlifting

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From what is considered a ‘good lift’ to the strongest Paralympian who has ever lived, here are 10 facts to know about para powerlifting ahead of the Tokyo 2020 Games:

1. Weightlifting was introduced in Tokyo 1964, and it wasn’t until the 1984 Paralympic Games that powerlifting also joined the discipline. The two coexisted at the Games until Barcelona 1992, when powerlifting officially replaced weightlifting.

Barcelona 1992 © IPC

2. Paralympic weightlifters lie on their back on a bench press, then take the weighted bar and lower it to their chest. They should hold it there still, before lifting it up until their arms are locked in position. Athletes are allowed three attempts and the winner is the athlete who lifts the most kilograms.

© Hiroki Nishioka

3. Athletes need a minimum of two good lifts (white light, as opposed to red light which indicates a bad lift) for their attempt to count towards the result.

© Hiroki Nishioka

4. Para-lifters have impaired lower limbs or hips, which would prevent them from participating in weightlifting without a disability (standing). Therefore, they compete in a bench press and classified by weight class.

© Hiroki Nishioka

5. There are 10 weight categories for men (up to 49 kg to over 107 kg) and 10 for women (up to 41 kg to over 86 kg) at Tokyo 2020.

© Hiroki Nishioka

6. Three judges surround the athletes as they compete, and each instantly decides whether the lift was performed correctly or not. They examine the body sequence, bar control, chest sequence and press sequence.

© Hiroki Nishioka

7. The referees have a device with five buttons including “Good Lift” and the lift phases listed above. The lift phase buttons are depressed if the referees believe the athlete has not performed the lift correctly, while the “Good Lift” button is depressed when the lift is considered correct.

© Hiroki Nishioka

8. In some cases, athletes can get a fourth attempt to break a world record. However, the fourth attempt does not count towards the athlete’s official result.

© Hiroki Nishioka

9. The women competed in powerlifting starting at the 2000 Games in Sydney.

© Getty

ten. The late Siamand Rahman of Iran is known as the strongest Paralympic athlete of all time. At Rio 2016, he made history when he broke the 310 kg mark for men over 107 kg, becoming the first to cross the 300 kg mark, setting a new world record and winning his second medal. consecutive Paralympic gold.

© Getty


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